Reedy Creek firefighters concerned by condition of emergency

The Reedy Creek Professional Firefighters Union says so many of their trucks and rescue units are out of commission that they’re responding to medical emergencies in SUVs. These problems are affecting their response times and capabilities. “On a normal day, we would have four fire engines and eight ambulances running all of the calls that serve the entire Disney property. Right now, we have only two of our fire engines actually in service, one tower truck, and then we have another crew that’s running out of our heavy rescue which does not have firefighting equipment on there,” Jon Shirey, president of the Reedy Creek Professional Firefighters Union, said. Shirey provided photos that show gear piled into the trunk of a Ford Escape and uniforms on the floor next to the doors.Videos from Shirey also show the units breaking down. One video depicts the gauge shifting into drive, but when the driver steps on the gas, the vehicle doesn’t move.Shirey says it had to be towed from an emergency room ambulance bay.”We’ve had multiple situations because of how poorly maintained our fleet of vehicles is, where an ambulance will break down en route to critical calls. We had a cardiac arrest call where the responding rescue broke down and then we had to send a separate rescue to go in and fill in for him. We had an incident where one of our own firefighters got injured on the job and had to be transported and the vehicle broke down en route to the hospital with him in it, so it’s a major safety concern for us,” Shirey said. He said he brought his concerns to the Reedy Creek administration, but they haven’t responded.WESH 2 News also reached out to the board and asked their communications director for a statement but were declined.We emailed every board member, giving them an opportunity to comment, but no members responded.We also submitted a public records request for information on the units that have yet to be received.

The Reedy Creek Professional Firefighters Union says so many of their trucks and rescue units are out of commission that they’re responding to medical emergencies in SUVs.

These problems are affecting their response times and capabilities.

“On a normal day, we would have four fire engines and eight ambulances running all of the calls that serve the entire Disney property. Right now, we have only two of our fire engines actually in service, one tower truck, and then we have another crew that’s running out of our heavy rescue which does not have firefighting equipment on there,” Jon Shirey, president of the Reedy Creek Professional Firefighters Union, said.

Shirey provided photos that show gear piled into the trunk of a Ford Escape and uniforms on the floor next to the doors.

Videos from Shirey also show the units breaking down. One video depicts the gauge shifting into drive, but when the driver steps on the gas, the vehicle doesn’t move.

Shirey says it had to be towed from an emergency room ambulance bay.

“We’ve had multiple situations because of how poorly maintained our fleet of vehicles is, where an ambulance will break down en route to critical calls. We had a cardiac arrest call where the responding rescue broke down and then we had to send a separate rescue to go in and fill in for him. We had an incident where one of our own firefighters got injured on the job and had to be transported and the vehicle broke down en route to the hospital with him in it, so it’s a major safety concern for us,” Shirey said.

He said he brought his concerns to the Reedy Creek administration, but they haven’t responded.

WESH 2 News also reached out to the board and asked their communications director for a statement but were declined.

We emailed every board member, giving them an opportunity to comment, but no members responded.

We also submitted a public records request for information on the units that have yet to be received.

SUVs